CHEO Research Institute Logo
Decrease Text SizeIncrease Text SizeFacebookTwitterYoutube

coordinators at a seminar  
What's New rss


12/4/2018

Could stem cells repair the heart, fight infections, mend premature lungs, and heal the brain after stroke?

French to follow below.
 
Could stem cells repair the heart, fight infections, mend premature lungs, and heal the brain after stroke?

Ottawa researchers closer to finding out, thanks to $999,900 from the Stem Cell Network

Researchers from The Ottawa Hospital, CHEO and the University of Ottawaphoto of a cell are bringing discoveries made in the lab closer to human trials and therapies, thanks to four new peer-reviewed research grants from the Stem Cell Network worth $999,900, part of an overall investment of $4 million across Canada. The Ottawa-based grants include:

Making new blood vessels in newborn lungs

Dr. Bernard Thébaud (The Ottawa Hospital, CHEO, uOttawa) and colleagues were awarded $99,900 to test umbilical cord blood cells called endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for treating high blood pressure in the lungs in experimental models. In newborns this condition doubles the risk of death, and survivors have long-term health problems. Dr. Thébaud’s team was the first to show that EPCs can lower lung blood pressure and encourage the lungs to grow by making new blood vessels in experimental models of newborn lung injury. This research may lead to a treatment that could benefit patients with other cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke or preeclampsia. Collaborators: Mervin Yoder, Dylan Burger.

Treating major heart attacks

Dr. Duncan Stewart (The Ottawa Hospital, uOttawa) and colleagues were awarded $500,000 to advance their world-first clinical trial of a genetically-enhanced stem cell therapy for heart attack. The new funding will help them open an additional trial site and run a preliminary analysis of the first 60 patients. Collaborators: David Courtman, Michael Kutryk, Michel Lemay, Chris Glover, Hung-Ly Quoc, Josep Rodes-Cabau, Dominique Joyal, Alexander Dick, Howard Leong Poi, Kim Connelly.

Clinical trial for septic shock

Dr. Lauralyn McIntyre, Dr. Shirley Mei (The Ottawa Hospital and uOttawa) and colleagues were awarded $200,000 to develop a stem cell bank and the final cell product to be used in the first multi-centre Phase 2 clinical trial of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for septic shock. This deadly condition occurs when an infection spreads throughout the body and over-activates the immune system, causing multiple organs to fail.

The trial will involve 114 patients at 10 academic hospitals across Canada. A Phase 1 trial found no adverse events associated with this treatment. Dr. McIntyre was awarded an additional $100,000 for preparing regulatory and ethics review documents and operational training and practise enrolling one to two patients at each of the participating sites.

Collaborators: Duncan Stewart, Dean Fergusson, John Marshall, Keith Walley, Claudia dos Santos, Brent Winston, Shane English, Alexis Turgeon, Geeta Mehta, Robert Green, Alison Fox-Robichaud, Margaret Herridge, John Granton, Paul Hebert, Kednapa Thavorn, Timothy Ramsay, The Ottawa Hospital Biotherapeutics Manufacturing Centre, Dana Devine, Canadian Blood Services

Repairing the brain after stroke

Dr. Eve Tsai (The Ottawa Hospital, uOttawa) and colleagues were awarded $100,000 to test whether a new biomaterial can stimulate the brain’s own stem cells to repair damage after a stroke in animal models. This biomaterial could be inserted during routine surgery after stroke. It would slowly release molecules that have been shown to boost the ability of brain stem cells to restore motor function after stroke. Collaborators: Xudong Cao, Ruth Slack.

These projects are examples of how research at The Ottawa Hospital is helping to make Ontario Healthier, Wealthier and Smarter.

The Ottawa Hospital: Inspired by research. Driven by compassion: The Ottawa Hospital is one of Canada’s largest learning and research hospitals with over 1,100 beds, approximately 12,000 staff and an annual budget of over $1.2 billion. Our focus on research and learning helps us develop new and innovative ways to treat patients and improve care. As a multi-campus hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa, we deliver specialized care to the Eastern Ontario region, but our techniques and research discoveries are adopted around the world. We engage the community at all levels to support our vision for better patient care. See www.ohri.ca for more information about research at The Ottawa Hospital.

CHEO Research Institute: The CHEO Research Institute coordinates the research activities of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and is affiliated with the University of Ottawa. Its three programs of research include molecular biomedicine, health information technology, and evidence to practice research. Key themes include cancer, diabetes, obesity, mental health, emergency medicine, musculoskeletal health, electronic health information and privacy, and genetics of rare disease. The CHEO Research Institute makes discoveries today for healthier kids tomorrow. For more information, visit www.cheori.org and @CHEOhospital

University of Ottawa —A crossroads of cultures and ideas: The University of Ottawa is home to over 50,000 students, faculty and staff, who live, work and study in both French and English. Our campus is a crossroads of cultures and ideas, where bold minds come together to inspire game-changing ideas. We are one of Canada’s top 10 research universities—our professors and researchers explore new approaches to today’s challenges. One of a handful of Canadian universities ranked among the top 200 in the world, we attract exceptional thinkers and welcome diverse perspectives from across the globe. www.uottawa.ca

Stem Cell Network

Supporting and building Canada’s stem cell and regenerative medicine research sector has been the raison d'etre of the Stem Cell Network (SCN) since its inception in 2001. Its work has been supported by the Government of Canada from the beginning. SCN’s mandate is to act as a catalyst for enabling the translation of stem cell research into clinical applications, commercial products and public policy. In just over 15 years SCN has forged a national community that has transformed stem cell research in Canada, brought research to the point where regenerative medicine is changing clinical practice and established an outstanding international reputation. SCN has pushed the boundaries of what was a basic research area towards translational outcomes for the clinic and marketplace. www.stemcellnetwork.ca

Media contacts

Amelia Buchanan, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; ambuchanan@ohri.ca; Office: 613-798-5555 x 73687; Cell: 613-297-8315

Aynsley Morris, CHEO Research Institute, 613 737-7600 x 4144; 613 914-3059, amorris@cheo.on.ca, @CHEOHospital

Véronique Vallée, University of Ottawa, 613-863-7221, veronique.vallee@uottawa.ca, @uOttawa
 

Les cellules souches pourraient-elles réparer le cœur, lutter contre les infections, développer les poumons des prématurés et régénérer les tissus du cerveau après un AVC?

Des chercheurs d’Ottawa qui ont reçu 999 900 $ du Réseau de cellules souches sont sur le point de trouver la réponse

Les travaux en laboratoire de chercheurs de L’Hôpital d’Ottawa, du CHEO et de l’Université d’Ottawa se rapprochent de l’étape des essais sur des humains et de la mise au point de traitements, grâce à quatre nouvelles subventions de recherche évaluées par des pairs financées par le Réseau de cellules souches totalisant 999 900 $ dans le cadre d’un investissement global de 4 M$ pour l’ensemble du Canada. À Ottawa, ces subventions serviront aux projets suivants :

Formation de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins pulmonaires chez les nouveau-nés

Le Dr Bernard Thébaud (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa, le CHEO et l’Université d’Ottawa) et ses collègues ont obtenu 99 900 $ afin de tester sur des modèles expérimentaux l’utilisation de cellules souches de cordons ombilicaux, appelées cellules progénitrices endothéliales, pour traiter l’hypertension pulmonaire. Chez les nouveau-nés souffrant de ce problème, le risque de décès est deux fois plus élevé, tandis que ceux qui survivent développent des problèmes de santé à long terme. L’équipe du Dr Thébaud est la première à avoir démontré que les cellules progénitrices endothéliales peuvent faire diminuer la tension artérielle et favoriser la croissance des poumons par la formation de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins à partir de modèles expérimentaux de lésions pulmonaires chez des nouveau-nés. Le traitement créé à partir de ces recherches pourrait également être utile aux patients ayant d’autres problèmes cardiovasculaires, comme une crise cardiaque, un AVC ou la prééclampsie. Collaborateurs : Mervin Yoder et Dylan Burger.

Traitement après un infarctus grave

Le Dr Duncan Stewart (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et l’Université d’Ottawa) et ses collègues ont obtenu 500 000 $ pour poursuivre le premier essai clinique au monde d’un traitement par cellules souches génétiquement modifiées après une crise cardiaque. Ces nouveaux fonds permettront à l’équipe de mettre en place un nouveau centre d’essai et de réaliser l’analyse préliminaire de 60 premiers patients. Collaborateurs : David Courtman, Michael Kutryk, Michel Lemay, Chris Glover, Hung-Ly Quoc, Josep Rodes-Cabau, Dominique Joyal, Alexander Dick, Howard Leong Poi et Kim Connelly.

Essai sur le choc septique

La Dre Lauralyn McIntyre, Shirley Mei, Ph.D. (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et l’Université d’Ottawa), ainsi que leurs collègues ont reçu 200 000 $ qui serviront à mettre au point une banque de cellules souches, de même que le produit final qui sera utilisé à la phase 2 du premier essai clinique multicentrique d’un traitement par cellules souches mésenchymateuses contre le choc septique. Le choc septique, qui peut être mortel, survient lorsqu’une infection se propage dans l’ensemble du corps et surstimule le système immunitaire, causant la défaillance de plusieurs organes.

L’essai portera sur 114 patients, dans 10 centres hospitaliers universitaires au Canada. La phase 1 de l’essai n’a révélé aucun événement indésirable associé à ce traitement. La Dre McIntyre a également obtenu une somme additionnelle de 100 000 $ afin de rédiger la documentation relative aux examens déontologiques et réglementaires, de préparer la formation opérationnelle et de recruter un ou deux patients à chacun des établissements participants.

Collaborateurs : Duncan Stewart, Dean Fergusson, John Marshall, Keith Walley, Claudia dos Santos, Brent Winston, Shane English, Alexis Turgeon, Geeta Mehta, Robert Green, Alison Fox-Robichaud, Margaret Herridge, John Granton, Paul Hebert, Kednapa Thavorn, Timothy Ramsay, Dana Devine, Centre de fabrication de biothérapies de L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et Société canadienne du sang

Régénération du cerveau après un AVC

La Dre Eve Tsai (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et l’Université d’Ottawa) et son équipe ont reçu 100 000 $ afin de tester sur des modèles animaux un nouveau biomatériau qui pourrait amener les cellules souches du cerveau à réparer les dommages causés par un AVC. Ce biomatériau pourrait être inséré dans le corps dans le cadre d’une opération courante suivant un AVC. Graduellement, il libérerait des molécules capables de stimuler les cellules souches cérébrales dans le but de restaurer les fonctions motrices. Collaborateurs : Xudong Cao et Ruth Slack.

Ces projets sont des exemples de ce que fait L’Hôpital d’Ottawa pour favoriser un Ontario plus sain, plus riche, plus informé.

L’Hôpital d’Ottawa : Inspiré par la recherche. Guidé par la compassion.
L’Hôpital d’Ottawa est l’un des plus importants hôpitaux d’enseignement et de recherche au Canada. Il est doté de plus de 1 100 lits, d’un effectif de quelque 12 000 personnes et d’un budget annuel d’environ 1,2 milliard de dollars. L’enseignement et la recherche étant au cœur de nos activités, nous possédons les outils qui nous permettent d’innover et d’améliorer les soins aux patients. Affilié à l’Université d’Ottawa, l’Hôpital fournit sur plusieurs campus des soins spécialisés à la population de l’Est de l’Ontario. Cela dit, nos techniques de pointe et les fruits de nos recherches sont adoptés partout dans le monde. Notre vision consiste à améliorer la qualité des soins et nous mobilisons l’appui de toute la collectivité pour mieux y parvenir. Pour en savoir plus sur la recherche à L’Hôpital d’Ottawa, visitez www.irho.ca

L’Institut de recherche du CHEO
L’Institut de recherche du CHEO, affilié à l’Université d’Ottawa, coordonne les activités de recherche au Centre hospitalier pour enfants de l’est de l’Ontario. Ses trois programmes de recherche comprennent la biomédecine moléculaire, les technologies de la santé et l’application des données probantes à la pratique médicale. Ses principaux domaines de recherche sont le cancer, le diabète, l’obésité, la santé mentale, la médecine d’urgence, la santé musculo-squelettique, les renseignements électroniques sur la santé et la protection des renseignements personnels, ainsi que la génétique des maladies rares. Les avancées réalisées aujourd’hui par l’Institut serviront à améliorer la santé des enfants de demain. Pour de plus amples renseignements, consultez le site Web www.cheori.org ou suivez-nous sur @CHEOhospital.

L’Université d’Ottawa : Un carrefour d’idées et de cultures
L’Université d’Ottawa compte plus de 50 000 étudiants, professeurs et employés administratifs qui vivent, travaillent et étudient en français et en anglais. Notre campus est un véritable carrefour des cultures et des idées, où les esprits audacieux se rassemblent pour relancer le débat et faire naître des idées transformatrices. Nous sommes l’une des 10 meilleures universités de recherche du Canada; nos professeurs et chercheurs explorent de nouvelles façons de relever les défis d’aujourd’hui. Classée parmi les 200 meilleures universités du monde, l’Université d’Ottawa attire les plus brillants penseurs et est ouverte à divers points de vue provenant de partout dans le monde.

Personnes ressource pour les médias
Amelia Buchanan, Spécialiste principale des communications, Institut de recherche de l’Hôpital d’Ottawa, ambuchanan@ohri.ca, Bureau : 613-798-5555, x 73687, Cell. : 613-297-8315

Aynsley Morris, CHEO Research Institute, 613 737-7600 x 4144; 613 914-3059, amorris@cheo.on.ca @CHEOHospital

Véronique Vallée, University of Ottawa, 613-863-7221, veronique.vallee@uottawa.ca, @uOttawa

Les cellules souches pourraient-elles réparer le cœur, lutter contre les infections, développer les poumons des prématurés et régénérer les tissus du cerveau après un AVC?

Des chercheurs d’Ottawa qui ont reçu 999 900 $ du Réseau de cellules souches sont sur le point de trouver la réponse

Les travaux en laboratoire de chercheurs de L’Hôpital d’Ottawa, du CHEO et de l’Université d’Ottawa se rapprochent de l’étape des essais sur des humains et de la mise au point de traitements, grâce à quatre nouvelles subventions de recherche évaluées par des pairs financées par le Réseau de cellules souches totalisant 999 900 $ dans le cadre d’un investissement global de 4 M$ pour l’ensemble du Canada. À Ottawa, ces subventions serviront aux projets suivants :

Formation de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins pulmonaires chez les nouveau-nés

Le Dr Bernard Thébaud (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa, le CHEO et l’Université d’Ottawa) et ses collègues ont obtenu 99 900 $ afin de tester sur des modèles expérimentaux l’utilisation de cellules souches de cordons ombilicaux, appelées cellules progénitrices endothéliales, pour traiter l’hypertension pulmonaire. Chez les nouveau-nés souffrant de ce problème, le risque de décès est deux fois plus élevé, tandis que ceux qui survivent développent des problèmes de santé à long terme. L’équipe du Dr Thébaud est la première à avoir démontré que les cellules progénitrices endothéliales peuvent faire diminuer la tension artérielle et favoriser la croissance des poumons par la formation de nouveaux vaisseaux sanguins à partir de modèles expérimentaux de lésions pulmonaires chez des nouveau-nés. Le traitement créé à partir de ces recherches pourrait également être utile aux patients ayant d’autres problèmes cardiovasculaires, comme une crise cardiaque, un AVC ou la prééclampsie. Collaborateurs : Mervin Yoder et Dylan Burger.

Traitement après un infarctus grave

Le Dr Duncan Stewart (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et l’Université d’Ottawa) et ses collègues ont obtenu 500 000 $ pour poursuivre le premier essai clinique au monde d’un traitement par cellules souches génétiquement modifiées après une crise cardiaque. Ces nouveaux fonds permettront à l’équipe de mettre en place un nouveau centre d’essai et de réaliser l’analyse préliminaire de 60 premiers patients. Collaborateurs : David Courtman, Michael Kutryk, Michel Lemay, Chris Glover, Hung-Ly Quoc, Josep Rodes-Cabau, Dominique Joyal, Alexander Dick, Howard Leong Poi et Kim Connelly.

Essai sur le choc septique

La Dre Lauralyn McIntyre, Shirley Mei, Ph.D. (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et l’Université d’Ottawa), ainsi que leurs collègues ont reçu 200 000 $ qui serviront à mettre au point une banque de cellules souches, de même que le produit final qui sera utilisé à la phase 2 du premier essai clinique multicentrique d’un traitement par cellules souches mésenchymateuses contre le choc septique. Le choc septique, qui peut être mortel, survient lorsqu’une infection se propage dans l’ensemble du corps et surstimule le système immunitaire, causant la défaillance de plusieurs organes.
L’essai portera sur 114 patients, dans 10 centres hospitaliers universitaires au Canada. La phase 1 de l’essai n’a révélé aucun événement indésirable associé à ce traitement. La Dre McIntyre a également obtenu une somme additionnelle de 100 000 $ afin de rédiger la documentation relative aux examens déontologiques et réglementaires, de préparer la formation opérationnelle et de recruter un ou deux patients à chacun des établissements participants.

Collaborateurs : Duncan Stewart, Dean Fergusson, John Marshall, Keith Walley, Claudia dos Santos, Brent Winston, Shane English, Alexis Turgeon, Geeta Mehta, Robert Green, Alison Fox-Robichaud, Margaret Herridge, John Granton, Paul Hebert, Kednapa Thavorn, Timothy Ramsay, Dana Devine, Centre de fabrication de biothérapies de L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et Société canadienne du sang

Régénération du cerveau après un AVC

La Dre Eve Tsai (L’Hôpital d’Ottawa et l’Université d’Ottawa) et son équipe ont reçu 100 000 $ afin de tester sur des modèles animaux un nouveau biomatériau qui pourrait amener les cellules souches du cerveau à réparer les dommages causés par un AVC. Ce biomatériau pourrait être inséré dans le corps dans le cadre d’une opération courante suivant un AVC. Graduellement, il libérerait des molécules capables de stimuler les cellules souches cérébrales dans le but de restaurer les fonctions motrices. Collaborateurs : Xudong Cao et Ruth Slack.

Ces projets sont des exemples de ce que fait L’Hôpital d’Ottawa pour favoriser un Ontario plus sain, plus riche, plus informé.

L’Hôpital d’Ottawa : Inspiré par la recherche. Guidé par la compassion.
L’Hôpital d’Ottawa est l’un des plus importants hôpitaux d’enseignement et de recherche au Canada. Il est doté de plus de 1 100 lits, d’un effectif de quelque 12 000 personnes et d’un budget annuel d’environ 1,2 milliard de dollars. L’enseignement et la recherche étant au cœur de nos activités, nous possédons les outils qui nous permettent d’innover et d’améliorer les soins aux patients. Affilié à l’Université d’Ottawa, l’Hôpital fournit sur plusieurs campus des soins spécialisés à la population de l’Est de l’Ontario. Cela dit, nos techniques de pointe et les fruits de nos recherches sont adoptés partout dans le monde. Notre vision consiste à améliorer la qualité des soins et nous mobilisons l’appui de toute la collectivité pour mieux y parvenir. Pour en savoir plus sur la recherche à L’Hôpital d’Ottawa, visitez www.irho.ca

L’Institut de recherche du CHEO
L’Institut de recherche du CHEO, affilié à l’Université d’Ottawa, coordonne les activités de recherche au Centre hospitalier pour enfants de l’est de l’Ontario. Ses trois programmes de recherche comprennent la biomédecine moléculaire, les technologies de la santé et l’application des données probantes à la pratique médicale. Ses principaux domaines de recherche sont le cancer, le diabète, l’obésité, la santé mentale, la médecine d’urgence, la santé musculo-squelettique, les renseignements électroniques sur la santé et la protection des renseignements personnels, ainsi que la génétique des maladies rares. Les avancées réalisées aujourd’hui par l’Institut serviront à améliorer la santé des enfants de demain. Pour de plus amples renseignements, consultez le site Web www.cheori.org ou suivez-nous sur @CHEOhospital.

L’Université d’Ottawa : Un carrefour d’idées et de cultures
L’Université d’Ottawa compte plus de 50 000 étudiants, professeurs et employés administratifs qui vivent, travaillent et étudient en français et en anglais. Notre campus est un véritable carrefour des cultures et des idées, où les esprits audacieux se rassemblent pour relancer le débat et faire naître des idées transformatrices. Nous sommes l’une des 10 meilleures universités de recherche du Canada; nos professeurs et chercheurs explorent de nouvelles façons de relever les défis d’aujourd’hui. Classée parmi les 200 meilleures universités du monde, l’Université d’Ottawa attire les plus brillants penseurs et est ouverte à divers points de vue provenant de partout dans le monde.

Personnes ressource pour les médias

Amelia Buchanan, Spécialiste principale des communications, Institut de recherche de l’Hôpital d’Ottawa, ambuchanan@ohri.ca, Bureau : 613-798-5555, x 73687, Cell. : 613-297-8315

Aynsley Morris, CHEO Research Institute, 613 737-7600 x 4144; 613 914-3059, amorris@cheo.on.ca @CHEOHospital

Véronique Vallée, University of Ottawa, 613-863-7221, veronique.vallee@uottawa.ca, @uOttawa
 
Take Action
Quick Links

Our Researchmagnifying glass

abcefg hijklmnopqrst uvwxyz